Captain Raymond Roberts - Bletchley Park codebreaker

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Captain Raymond Roberts - Bletchley Park codebreaker

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From the Daily Mail, anothger part of WW2 consigned to the history books.
John
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... ystem.html

Last surviving Bletchley Park codebreaker who helped to crack Hitler's 'Tunny' system dies aged 93
Captain Raymond Roberts was last survivor of crucial codebreaking team
They succeeded in cracking the German High Command's Tunny code
Tunny used four times as many encryption wheels as the Enigma machine
It was used to send messages between Hitler and his top Generals
By SIAN BOYLE

The last survivor of a crucial Second World War codebreaking team at Bletchley Park died yesterday.
Raymond ‘Jerry’ Roberts - who helped crack the system carrying messages between Hitler and his top generals – died yesterday aged 93.
Captain Roberts was the last remaining member of a four-man team which had cracked the German High Command’s Tunny code at the British listening post – and in doing so helped shorten the war by at least two years.
Tunny, the target of their code-breaking efforts, used four times as many encryption wheels as the famous Enigma machine.
Bletchley Park codebreaker Raymond 'Jerry' Roberts, who helped smash the German high command's Tunny system, has died aged 93 +5
Bletchley Park codebreaker Raymond 'Jerry' Roberts, who helped smash the German high command's Tunny system, has died aged 93
Last year, to mark the significance of Captain Robert’s work, he received an MBE and a set of commemorative stamps issued in his name.

He told the BBC: ‘This was intelligence gold dust, really top level stuff. [We cracked the] movements of troops, not just divisions or regiments but of [whole] armies.’
He also described seeing the messages between Hitler and his generals and says a landmark moment in his career was ‘seeing the signature come up - of “Adolf, spacer, Hitler, spacer, fuhrer, spacer”.


The rebuilt Tunny machine at The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park and a wartime photograph of Captain Raymond 'Jerry' Roberts, one of the four man team who cracked the code
The highly-secretive work at the Bletchley Park listening post, is believed to have shortened the length of the war by at least two years +5

'A very simple signature; I imagine the person who received the signature stood up and saluted.’
Captain Roberts joined Bletchley Park as a German linguist and was among the four founder members of the Testery section, named after its head Ralph Tester.
Captain Roberts became a tireless ambassador for the memory of those who had served in secret, and spent years campaigning for acknowledgement of his colleagues, including Alan Turing, who broke the naval Enigma.

He argued the Testery as a whole should be honoured for its work - including Bill Tutte who broke the Tunny system to help shorten the war; and Tommy Flowers, who designed and built the Colossus, which sped up some stages of the breaking of Tunny traffic.
Their stream of intelligence proved vital in the D-Day invasion and helped save many lives.
The codebreaker, originally from Liphook in Hampshire, worked at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire, until the end of the Second World War before spending two years at the War Crimes Investigation Unit, and then moved on to a 50-year career in marketing and research.
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