Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

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Nocturna mors
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Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by Nocturna mors »

Dated 3rd May
Over 70 years ago it was gunned down off the English coast as the Second World War raged in the skies.
The Dornier 17 German bomber was blasted from the air during the Battle of Britain in 1940, and has remained beneath the waves off the Kent coastline ever since.
But work began yesterday to raise the unique wartime aircraft from its watery grave in the English Channel, in one of the most ambitious salvage operations ever undertaken in British waters.
A team of divers spotted the rare aircraft lying 50ft down and upside down on the Goodwin Sands just off the Kent coast in 2008.
Sonar scans identified the plane as Dornier Do 17Z-2, serial number 1160, and it is the only surviving example in the world.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/dornier-17-bom ... ml#cR52XZl

Tom
"Rule Britannia two tanners make a bob,three make eighten pence and four two bob"!

Nocturna mors
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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by Nocturna mors »

A plan to raise the only surviving World War II Dornier 17 bomber from the English Channel has run into difficulties due to bad weather.
Experts salvaging the German aircraft, which is lying in 50ft of water at Goodwin Sands, off the Kent coast, have had to ditch their original strategy.
A faster but riskier approach will now take place.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22721897

Tom
"Rule Britannia two tanners make a bob,three make eighten pence and four two bob"!

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K4KittyCrew
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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by K4KittyCrew »

Cheers Tom. Sincerely hope they can manage to lift her, rebuild and display the aircraft.
John
K for Kitty Crew - Winthorpe, 1661 HCU's - stirlingaircraftsoc.raf38group.org/
630 Squadron - East Kirkby
" There is nothing glorious about war with the exception of those who served us so valiantly"

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K4KittyCrew
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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by K4KittyCrew »

Well, they have done it .............. great work although, you have to wonder what they can really salvage here.
John

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... l-bed.html
K for Kitty Crew - Winthorpe, 1661 HCU's - stirlingaircraftsoc.raf38group.org/
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" There is nothing glorious about war with the exception of those who served us so valiantly"

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AlanW
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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by AlanW »

"Remarkable" condition, is rather an "overstatement" i think.
There is no paralell in warfare, to such courage and determination in the face of danger, over so long a period. Such devotion, should never be forgotten.

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GuyMassey
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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by GuyMassey »

It really is in astonishing condition having been submerged in salt water for 70 years! Sad to say that although hundreds of Stirlings and other allied aircraft must also lie at the bottom of the North Sea and Channel, I doubt whether any are so intact. I only hope that now it is up, modern preservation techniques work well. I am also delighted that they will be picking up the bits that were left behind. Well done to all those involved, and thank you to the RAF Museum for giving future generations a chance to see it. :D
"The purpose of life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave with a well-preserved body, but rather to Slide in Sideways, completely used up, yelling and screaming, what a ride!" anon.

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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by kookabat »

Sonar scans identified the plane as Dornier Do 17Z-2, serial number 1160
Geez, sonar's pretty high-resolution these days isn't it?? :D
Remembering the crew of 467 Sqn Lancaster LM475 PO-B Jan-May 1944
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smudgersmith218
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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by smudgersmith218 »

Gents,

Not wishing to upset our members, but am I the only person who thinks this is a miss direction of money?

I am all for preservation, but the likelihood of the Do17 looking anything other than a wreck is remote. If it was not for the BoB connection it would have just been left on the sands.
When ever I visit Hendon and look at the Halifax I am always left with a sense of frustration, take away the historical aspect, the Tirpitz your left with what, a hulk. From memory the decision not to restore was a financial one, but up to 750k can be spent on a Do17?

For me, the cost to date of around £350k for the recovery and a further 500k for restoration could have been better spent on completing the Hampden Restoration at Cosford or the Blenheim Restoration. The award of such a financial windfall would and could have made a tremendous difference especially for the Blenheim team, see link http://www.arc-duxford.co.uk/restorations/blenheim/

The end result from both projects is almost genuine example of the type in all it’s former glory, that to me is more satisfying from a restoration perspective.

The addition of these two unique aircraft to the current stock of aircraft currently on strength in the UK would be very welcome.

Rant over back to my hole !!
No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron 1918-1945
The Nomads

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K4KittyCrew
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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by K4KittyCrew »

Hi Steve, probably fair to say that we all have different views on which aircraft projects, the limited available funds should be spent on.

I'm thinking with today's technology, one would have thought such monies be best spent, finding a Short Stirling in the 'Zuiderzee' of Holland and or the North Sea in general.
Out of the hundreds, one can only assume that such an aircraft, one at least, glided into the waters and would be somewhat intact.............. wishful thinking, with a bit of realism thrown in.

This aircraft is the missing link of the 'heavies'.
John
K for Kitty Crew - Winthorpe, 1661 HCU's - stirlingaircraftsoc.raf38group.org/
630 Squadron - East Kirkby
" There is nothing glorious about war with the exception of those who served us so valiantly"

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GuyMassey
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Re: Goodwin sands Do17 seabed salvage

Post by GuyMassey »

I knew there would be differing opinions as to the need to raise the wreck.

I personally believe that it is vitally important to preserve these artefacts for future generations. There is nothing more emotive than close contact with a wreck, be that an aircraft or ship. Being close to something that bears the scars of conflict and time, with all the human tragedy that goes with it cannot help but put the viewer in touch with those brave generations past.

A pristine restoration, re-build or replica lacks that direct link, and therefore the emotion that it generates. Both need to be viewed together in order to educate future generations. Static museum exhibits are every bit as important as flying examples and help complete the picture.

I also hope that a Stirling will one day be found and raised, regardless of it's condition. Sadly though one has not yet been found and as time passes it becomes more and more unlikely that one ever will be. A unique Battle of Britain DO17 has though, and it would have been criminal to have left it to crumble away, forgotten on the sea-bed.

I say again, thank you to the RAF Museum for recovering this aircraft so that future generations can learn from the past.
"The purpose of life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave with a well-preserved body, but rather to Slide in Sideways, completely used up, yelling and screaming, what a ride!" anon.

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